Social Media: Dangers of jumping to conclusions

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djbaxter

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Brands Heed Social Media. They’re Advised Not to Forget Word of Mouth.
By JANET MORRISSEY , New York Times
November 26, 2017

When President Trump sent an angry tweet in February blasting Nordstrom for dropping his daughter Ivanka’s clothing line from its stores, his supporters took to social media to intensify their previous calls to boycott the retailer. Nordstrom had reason to worry: Previous tweets from Mr. Trump calling out other brands, such as Lockheed Martin, had hurt share prices.

Instead, Nordstrom’s shares rose, and its business outperformed many of its rivals in the troubled retail industry in the months that followed.

It was an example of the “dichotomy” between what people say in the heat of a moment online and how they act offline, said Jay York, a senior digital marketing strategist at EMSI Public Relations. And it showcases the need for companies to monitor both online and offline conversations to get a true picture of how people feel about a brand and any controversies it may find itself embroiled in.

On average, 19 percent of a brand’s sales — or between $7 trillion and $10 trillion in annual consumer spending in the United States — are driven by social conversations, both online and offline, according to a new study conducted by Engagement Labs, a Canadian company that analyzes conversations around brands. The study, which looked at 170 brands, found that companies often wrongly saw social media as an accurate and sufficient guide for tracking consumer sentiment. Often, though, that social conversation might be much different from what people are saying in private conversations with friends and family, the study said.

“The danger is you can make some pretty big mistakes if you assume the conversations happening online are also happening offline,” said Brad Fay, chief research officer at Engagement Labs and a co-author of the study. “Very often, they’re heading in different directions.”

The most negative and most outrageous comments often get the most traction on social media. And sometimes, people post comments about a topic just to get a reaction or to reflect an “image” or appear “cool” to their social media followers, when their actual views may be the opposite.

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Edvin

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Once someone told me that a good Public Relation (PR) beats any marketing campaign.
It appears Mr. Trump simply reminded the shoppers to go back to Nordstrom; thereby, increasing the sales.
 
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djbaxter

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And/or:
  • the reason for Trump twitter-attacking Nordstrom (they rejected his daughter's product line) was seen as a positive move for Nordfstrom; and/or
  • the general dislike for Trump's ongoing attempts to bully those who don't fall in line with what he wants backfired again and people increased their purchases at Nordstrom as a protest against his tactics.
 

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