yemi

Member
Hi All,
I am looking to start my own business with an app I'm creating for my current CEO, but not sure how to start. The challenge is getting in touch with potential customers because they are hard to get a hold off and the concept is new.
The idea around the app is automating the concept of "the balanced scorecard". I see huge results in productivity from an alternate version, but scared if I deploy the app for my current employer, they might be able to claim it as a work invention.
The app still needs some work, so my question is, what's the best way to approach a CEO with this type of idea and let him/she understand that I'm looking to use them to develop and pilot the idea?

Please advise

Thank you
 

Edvin

MVP
Hi Yemi,

Working for someone most likely means that they will own all the intellectual properties; so, you have to protect the idea before presenting it.

Did you know amazon patented one-click-buying, which recently expired.
That's right, you can patent your concept.

Properly filing a patent can easily cost over $5000; however, to submit an application for a patent costs only a few hundred dollars. This also has the benefit of amending the patent when it is in a patent pending state.

With patent in hand, you can present the idea to your boss.
Your employer can claim the rights to your source code if you code it during your employment; but, they have to license the right to use the solution from you.

If you implement the software for your employer at work, then the employer can claim that you are using their intellectual property when you create it "home". To work around this, you would need to get other developers to create the application from a software specification document, which you can provide; thereby, removing you from having intimate knowledge of software internals. Alternatively, you can come to an agreement with your boss that you will work after hours and make the software available for a fee so that you don't have to work around this technical intellectual property issue; thereby, giving them a competitive advantahge.
 
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