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Making your website.

Discussion in 'General Business and Entrepreneurship' started by JayA, Aug 17, 2017.

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  1. JayA Member

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    Hi all,

    As a new guy in any sort of entrepreneural network/setting and a web programmer by trade I'm a bit curious; How is the website your business use made? Is it made from scratch or are you using a content management system like wordpress or drupal, etc. or perhaps you don't have one? And if you don't, why not?

    Did you make or set up the website yourself or did you hire someone to make it? Are you employing someone / paying for a service to manage your website for you such as adding content and updating products/services you offer or do you take care of it yourself?
     
    djbaxter likes this.
  2. pedrocampos

    pedrocampos Member

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    If you have the time to do it, use your skills, if you are short on time you can outsource the website. Personally, I use a blog to drive content and to make it more engaging for people. My ideal method is to create a blog post, make a video about it and syndicate the content.
     
  3. JayA Member

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    I will be making the website myself using wordpress as it is a platform I am familiar with. I was curious about how others approached this aspect of their business.

    Did you set up your blog yourself? Are you running an online or offline business?
     
  4. pedrocampos

    pedrocampos Member

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    I operate online and my blog is connected to a network of bloggers that promote the same program. It is an educational marketing community with a blog platform of their own.
     
  5. Allrise

    Allrise Member

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    I built ours using Wordpress. IMO, starting with a robust CMS allows to you grow your site as business demands. Building off HTML makes growth/site expansion a lot more time consuming and complicated. - Jon
     
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  6. mentrabi

    mentrabi Member

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    I used WordPress as well but hired out the process once I knew the design. Had some struggles using freelancers so I'm bringing the work back internally. Aka I'm going to take it over until I can document a process that works for me.
     
  7. JayA Member

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    @pedrocampos Ah, I see! Sounds interesting indeed. Have you been doing it long?

    @Allrise I agree wholeheartedly Jon, For a long long time I was a big opponent of Wordpress and similar systems, but boy was I wrong! Today I absolutely love it and the flexibility it allows and you can be up and running in an instant. Of course, at this point I am fairly biased as my website is built on it, and the products I'll be offering will be for it too ;)

    @mentrabi I'm sorry to hear you had some troubles with freelancers. You say you used Wordpress, does that mean you decided to use something else, or do you mean you are making the site using WP yourself?
     
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  8. mentrabi

    mentrabi Member

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    The trouble with the freelancer was mainly my fault to effectively lead them to a successful outcome. So, I'm going to do it myself until I am in a spot to be a better leader and profitably fund the upkeep.

    I'm not starting from scratch I will continue to use WP and what he created but take it over
     
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  9. JayA Member

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    Sound like a good plan. Best of luck to you!
     
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  10. Apparently over 20% of the internet now is using wordpress. For our site we used Jruby on Rails. I wanted a great deal of control on the coding aspect and I wanted to be able to push updates as i saw fit. Ive found wordpress great for simple sites and simple needs. But as a site needs more the implementation and plugins required for wordpress to handle become cumbersome and kind of obnoxious.

    For our clients its the right tool for the right job.
     
    djbaxter likes this.
  11. djbaxter

    djbaxter Administrator Moderator Member

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    Recent 2017 statistics put that figure closer t0 27-28%. If you consider only those sites that use a CMS, the figure is about 47% and climbing.

    I'm not sure when you last looked at Wordpress but that capability is now available in Wordpress.

    I disagree but that's why it's great to have a choice of software. It's not just a matter of what works better but also what feels better to you. Look at the rivalry between iPhones and Androids. Personally, I hate Androids and find them klutzy and cumbersome but I know many people feel that way about iPhones. (Sometimes that's a matter of what you are used to but in my case my original phones were all Blackberry, until that company started making bad decisions and going downhill fast and they're OS updates all kept crashing.)

    And that is the bottom line. If it works for you and your clients, you have what you need. :)
     

  12. I appreciate the significant amount of disagreements on my reply. My points were simply based on my opinion and experience. Given that almost ZERO large scale enterprises use Wordpress as their primary web site portal it shows that I am not the only one who doesnt like it as a platform. Example: Walmart does not use wordpress's woocart for its shopping cart, neither does ebay. Scalability IS a valid reason to consider alternatives. Over manipulating a CMS system to become what a business needs is probably a good way to create a significant amount of technical debt and problems down the line. Hence I am re-affirming my assertion that as it scales it gets obnoxious. PHP for that matter also has scaling issues which is why Facebook moved away from it.

    When I mentioned 20% was a 7 point difference REALLY worth arguing against? Or was it mentioned just to assert authority?
     
  13. djbaxter

    djbaxter Administrator Moderator Member

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    Neither. I was merely pointing out that the number and proportion of sites is increasing every year.

    No offense was intended. I was simply offering my opinion, as you offered yours. And if you read all of my reply, you'll see that I was also trying to convey respect for your opinion and other dissenting views.

    There is no one size fits all.
     
  14. JayA Member

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    @ExeterStudios Wordpress used to be quite cumbersome if you go back some 5-10 years, where it was mainly a platform to build blogs on. I myself was quite the opponent against WP as a platform because of the many many security breaches you hear about that happened to wordpress sites. This along with sites being very bloated very quickly when you added a lot of content and poor SEO structuring made me stay clear of anything wordpress for years.

    However, in the last 5 years maybe, WP has really made massive moves towards being a much more generalized CMS, not just a blog CMS. And the bloating and SEO issues are pretty much all coming down to what plugins and themes you use.

    As for the bigger sites you mention, they are all really massive. I believe the walmart website has over 350million visitors per month (from a quick search) and facebook, well - they are in a category of their own with their 2Billion monthly users. Sites like these MUST have custom solutions, there is simply no out of the box system that would work.

    BUT, large sites can use wordpress if they want and quite a few do (check out vip.wordpress.com to see some case reports). But again, the larger the site, the more custom you have to get. But thats not an exclusive WP problem, thats a general problem with any solution.

    I used to build almost all the sites for my clients from scratch, and after some time I had a "modular builder" of my own where I used bits and pieces based on what the client wanted, something I could have achieved using a CMS and a set of plugins. Which in turn would have meant an easier time for my clients. And is how I checked out a series of CMS and ended up with Wordpress.

    But like you also say, in the end it is what your clients want and are happy with that matters, and if you have found that and it works for you, that it is awesome!

    @djbaxter Having used both Android and iPhones too, I have ended up with an android phone, and an iPad tablet. I don't really like the restrictiveness of Apple products, but that said, Android is picking up the pace in the restrictiveness too as seems to be more and more standard with a lot of products in the tech industry these days. Don't get me started on windows.. Gonna need a separate discussion for that one.
     
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  15. djbaxter

    djbaxter Administrator Moderator Member

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    3 Different ways to build your first website

     
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