Hyperlocal Advertising for Local Businesses

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djbaxter

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Why Hyperlocal Advertising Works So Well for Local Businesses
by Itai Elizur, SmallBizTrends.com
January 16, 2017

If we listen to conventional wisdom, businesses should be using TV, radio and online banner ads to attract new customers. But when it comes to local businesses, these channels simply aren’t as effective as turning to local marketing.

Many local businesses are finding that hyperlocal advertising — in any media channel that is primarily focused on the needs and issues of the people in that immediate vicinity or community — are more effective than traditional mass-market ads.

Community-based newspapers and magazines, metro blogs, online neighborhood community platforms, plus out-of-home advertising (OOH) like posters at bus stops and digital screens at the gas pump are all good examples of powerful hyperlocal channels.
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(c) Images Source Outsmart

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One of the things I think this article underscores is that not all business are the same and the best way to promote one business may not always be the best way to promote another.

As I and others have said before: Know your customers and go where they go if you want to reach them.
 

Jessica Danes

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As a local business owner, this makes all the difference! Sure, I have advertisements online, but the customer draw I usually get comes from a recurring ad in the local newspaper. For me, this is also cheaper as I am not paying into running unneeded ads over the radio or local tv channels. I've never really looked into gas pump ads - does anyone have statistics on how much draw this advertising brings? I know when I'm at the gas station, I ignore the tv, so I cannot imagine this method being too successful.
 

Jrob

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Newspapers, direct mail and text messaging (SMS) can be all winners for local business. The message is more important than the medium.
 

Edvin

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Is it about Advertising or about Marketing?

As I'm gearing up for my business I'm thinking about my marketing strategy in education sector.
I have yet to execute; but, my plan is to host a low cost or free educational workshop (i.e. Chess, Lego STEM, etc) and try to market it using different mediums (i.e. door hangers, radio, banners, etc). The services of business entity is self-explanatory; so, there is no need for "buy-now" message. However, the parents that register their kids for the workshop will want to be notified (i.e. subscribe-in) about future similar workshop because there is limited seating available (first-come-first-serve) and the workshop is valuable in its-own right.
With little creativity, I believe I can measure the effectiveness and reach of every marketing campaign.
For example, staggering promotional events or making use of discount codes can identify campaign reach.
To further support my marketing campaign, I am considering to offer Lego STEM birthday-party on Sundays. The revenue from birthday-party is of no significance; but, I do get an opportunity to extend my business reach to other parents.

Admittedly, there is a need to do effective promotion ad campaign (i.e. holiday sale); but, in my early stages I'm more concerned about prospective customers to know about my existence and presence.
 

Jrob

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Is it about Advertising or about Marketing?

As I'm gearing up for my business I'm thinking about my marketing strategy in education sector.
I have yet to execute; but, my plan is to host a low cost or free educational workshop (i.e. Chess, Lego STEM, etc) and try to market it using different mediums (i.e. door hangers, radio, banners, etc). The services of business entity is self-explanatory; so, there is no need for "buy-now" message. However, the parents that register their kids for the workshop will want to be notified (i.e. subscribe-in) about future similar workshop because there is limited seating available (first-come-first-serve) and the workshop is valuable in its-own right.
With little creativity, I believe I can measure the effectiveness and reach of every marketing campaign.
For example, staggering promotional events or making use of discount codes can identify campaign reach.
To further support my marketing campaign, I am considering to offer Lego STEM birthday-party on Sundays. The revenue from birthday-party is of no significance; but, I do get an opportunity to extend my business reach to other parents.

Admittedly, there is a need to do effective promotion ad campaign (i.e. holiday sale); but, in my early stages I'm more concerned about prospective customers to know about my existence and presence.
I think your plan is fantastic with the workshop to educate. Just collect the contact info, for the people who are in the information gathering stage and not ready to buy right now.
 

Lisa B

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Newspapers, direct mail and text messaging (SMS) can be all winners for local business. The message is more important than the medium.
So customers respond well to SMS texting? I thought It might feel spammy even if only occasionally? No?
 

djbaxter

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I think it depends on both the company sending and the person receiving the messages.

I allowed my mobile provider to send me text ads for a while but they got annoying since they were usually nags to get the latest phone or upgrade my data package. I canceled those. I might have felt differently if they were things I actually wanted.

I still allow PetSmart to send me texts about specials (for my cat Mindy) but I may cancel those too.

They can get irritating in a hurry and the last thing any business should be doing is annoying current or potential customers.
 

Rila Studios

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Facebook ads is now the best form of advertising for any business since its super targeted. You can target people based on their interests, their behavior, location and job. Its so targeted that you can select the perfect person you want and reach hundreds and thousands of them in a day for $5 or more it depends on the country. I think you should take advantage of this opportunity before it becomes expensive.
 

parvati

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Social Media can also help in advertising the business and attracting new clients. For example, creating a new account in Instagram is a good way for providing interest people, who want to use your product. I can recommend Instagram Auto Comment Free | Zen Promo for this purpose, as it helps to promote account and to attract as more people as possible. You'll also get more views and likes.
 

SkyWriting

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Why Hyperlocal Advertising Works So Well for Local Businesses
by Itai Elizur, SmallBizTrends.com
January 16, 2017



Hyperlocal-Media.png

Ad-Recal.png
(c) Images Source Outsmart

Read more...


One of the things I think this article underscores is that not all business are the same and the best way to promote one business may not always be the best way to promote another.

As I and others have said before: Know your customers and go where they go if you want to reach them.

The reason is that frequency is king. What you frequently see gets your attention first. If you see an ad, plus the location, you might not even connect the two.....ads being all fake, and storefront being reality. Gum on the sidewalk? No pizza for me there! Open sign left on 24 hours? Then the owner must be inside sleeping, waiting for people to show.
 

SkyWriting

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So customers respond well to SMS texting? I thought It might feel spammy even if only occasionally? No?
Frequency is never a marketing problem. The problem is not providing value or being impersonal. If you want discounts then 3 a day is not too much. If you only want information, then only the right information is correct.

People do want what they want. I'd like to know if a business is empty and service is fast. But If I get there and service is slow...then so long sandwich shop. Treat each customer just as they want to be treated.
 

SkyWriting

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Newspapers, direct mail and text messaging (SMS) can be all winners for local business. The message is more important than the medium.
The message is all important. I don't mind the blood center promotions on my phone, because they can be appealing, even when giving blood is not.
 

SkyWriting

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As a local business owner, this makes all the difference! Sure, I have advertisements online, but the customer draw I usually get comes from a recurring ad in the local newspaper. For me, this is also cheaper as I am not paying into running unneeded ads over the radio or local tv channels. I've never really looked into gas pump ads - does anyone have statistics on how much draw this advertising brings? I know when I'm at the gas station, I ignore the tv, so I cannot imagine this method being too successful.
Test different marketing in different channels. But don't assume that the customers you get are average. Your best customers might not have been reached yet by you.

Create an "avatar" of your ideal customer. Sell to that one. The response will be better, your investment will go further.
 

SkyWriting

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Why Hyperlocal Advertising Works So Well for Local Businesses
by Itai Elizur, SmallBizTrends.com
January 16, 2017



Hyperlocal-Media.png

Ad-Recal.png
(c) Images Source Outsmart

Read more...


One of the things I think this article underscores is that not all business are the same and the best way to promote one business may not always be the best way to promote another.

As I and others have said before: Know your customers and go where they go if you want to reach them.

Another massively overlooked source is signage. Perhaps 4 out of 5 businesses give little indication of what they are selling inside. Another mistake is not making hyper-local offers. Maybe 1% of retail businesses provide an offer to people passing by the location.

I was working with my sole meat supplier a few years ago (Wyoming Meat Company) urging him to sell beef jerky to traffic that passed by his factory. I encouraged him to get a portable sign with movable letters so he could make daily offers to local traffic headed to Yellowstone Park. Instead he spent his last remaining savings on a "Brand" sign for the building....which was half a block from the highway. He ignored my advice and the company folded taking all his retirement savings and putting three employees out of work. I have never stopped offering business advice since that day and ignore all naysayers.
 
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SARubin

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I was working with my sole meat supplier a few years ago (Wyoming Meat Company) urging him to sell beef jerky to traffic that passed by his factory. I encouraged him to get a portable sign with movable letters so he could make daily offers to local traffic headed to Yellowstone Park. Instead he spent his last remaining savings on a "Brand" sign for the building....which was half a block from the highway. He ignored my advice and the company folded taking all his retirement savings and putting three employees out of work. I have never stopped offering business advice since that day and ignore all naysayers.
Well, that's a real cute story (assuming it's actually true) but if some guy really spent his "last remaining savings" on a sign for his shop... then beef jerky, or no beef jerky, that guy was about to go out of business anyway.

Anyone who makes foolish purchases, when they can't even make payroll, probably shouldn't be in business in the first place. (And there's nothing wrong with that. Many people are just better off being employees, instead of business owners)

And I know signage can be expensive. But if someone drains their retirement savings for a sign, then that's a sign (no pun intended) of a much larger issue.
 

SkyWriting

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Well, that's a real cute story (assuming it's actually true) but if some guy really spent his "last remaining savings" on a sign for his shop... then beef jerky, or no beef jerky, that guy was about to go out of business anyway.

Anyone who makes foolish purchases, when they can't even make payroll, probably shouldn't be in business in the first place. (And there's nothing wrong with that. Many people are just better off being employees, instead of business owners)

And I know signage can be expensive. But if someone drains their retirement savings for a sign, then that's a sign (no pun intended) of a much larger issue.

The story is actually longer than that. I urged him to gather up his past customer list and make a great offer to them to raise some cash to stay afloat another month. He said he didn't have the time to gather up all the names and addresses.

Oh, he was definitely a business newbie. I offered to buy his house and factory, but I'd need him to get closer to profitability first. His last few weeks before closing he spent designing his website to make it look slicker. On a positive note, somebody bought his land and business. It was a good deal at $150k wyomingcustommeats.com
 

SkyWriting

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Is it about Advertising or about Marketing?

As I'm gearing up for my business I'm thinking about my marketing strategy in education sector.
I have yet to execute; but, my plan is to host a low cost or free educational workshop (i.e. Chess, Lego STEM, etc) and try to market it using different mediums (i.e. door hangers, radio, banners, etc). The services of business entity is self-explanatory; so, there is no need for "buy-now" message. However, the parents that register their kids for the workshop will want to be notified (i.e. subscribe-in) about future similar workshop because there is limited seating available (first-come-first-serve) and the workshop is valuable in its-own right.
With little creativity, I believe I can measure the effectiveness and reach of every marketing campaign.
For example, staggering promotional events or making use of discount codes can identify campaign reach.
To further support my marketing campaign, I am considering to offer Lego STEM birthday-party on Sundays. The revenue from birthday-party is of no significance; but, I do get an opportunity to extend my business reach to other parents.

Admittedly, there is a need to do effective promotion ad campaign (i.e. holiday sale); but, in my early stages I'm more concerned about prospective customers to know about my existence and presence.

Every contact with consumers needs a "Call-To-Action!" included. "Buy-Now" is the last of a multi step process. "Call Now For a Free Recorded Message" is an example of a great first step. "Now" is important, "free" is important, and "Recorded" is important. Nobody want to call a sales person. But you can explain all the benefits in a recorded message.

And the message should be professionally scripted as voice infomercial. The benefits that they want is what you are selling. Likely this differs from the benefits you think are important. So write your script carefully.
 

SkyWriting

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Well, that's a real cute story (assuming it's actually true) but if some guy really spent his "last remaining savings" on a sign for his shop... then beef jerky, or no beef jerky, that guy was about to go out of business anyway.
Yes. It's a perfect example of "Ego Marketing" where he spent is last $1000 on a sign for his building which is not even near the road, and on upgrading his website so that it's looked more "pretty". Both were a reaction to his bruised ego have spent all his 401 savings.
 
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