How does the market react to the new TLDs?

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Thread starter #1
Hey!
I'm starting my first eCommerce niche website.
There will be many experienced business people here.
I want your opinion on how the market reacts to new TLDs like .store , .shop & others compared to .com

And how does Google rank these domain in relation to one another?

Thanks!
 

djbaxter

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#2
Those are two questions.

The easy one first: How does Google rank new TLDs? The same as any other TLD. It does not have separate algorithms for different TLDs, not even the old ones, and never did. Some years ago, everyone seemed to believe that snagging a link from a .edu domain was Google Gold and would guarantee you a rank boost. That was never true and still is not true today. The only reason some people saw a correlation was because legitimate .edu domains tend to be older and have higher link authority.

The second question: How does the market react to new TLDs?

It depends on both the market and the specific new TLD. In general, the new TLDs do not have a great public reputation. For example, domains like .info tend to be seen as cheap or throwaway sites.

On the other hand, as an example, I know that the legal domain gravitated quickly to .lawyer or .law.lawyer domains and they work very well for that profession.

So I think new TLDs can work well if they are descriptive of the business or service or website content.

But personally, I would avoid the more generic ones like .info or the non-informative ones like .expert.
 
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Thread starter #3
Thanks sir!
I was just more concerned about the trust factor that people will have upon seeing .com vs .store
.com is the way to go I guess.
 

djbaxter

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#4
If you can get a decent .com domain for your site, yes that would usually be my first choice.

However, using country TLDs may be preferred in some cases, like .eu or .co.uk.
 
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#5
The only difference is that people are used to .com and it's easily recognisable. As djbaxter said, if the TLD makes some sense regarding the thing you do then it's fine to use it. But i would strongly recommend to never buy TLD with more than 4 letters as they're basically of junk value for multiple reasons.

What i mean by that is that it's likely you will get no value or low value for the domain in the future. Also lengthly TLDs result in even lengthier domains, which sucks. This does not mean that you get penalised, technically at least.

Another thing to keep in mind is that CCTLDs (country code) get ranked higher than GTLDs (general) in searches coming from within that country. This is why we always recommend as best case scenario to register as many CCTLDs as possible when wanting to go international. But that's a question of budget!

In any case i when it comes to domains it's a good idea to ignore the hype. It's a well known practice in this field, with companies/individuals who are massively invested in a TLD (for example who have the rights to sell and manage, or who own a very large number of domains) to buy articles around the internet hyping the new TLD so that people will buy them, only to find out later that no one wants to type .consulting or .management as a TLD.

I would buy a domain like next.web or ranked.now but not global.consulting or squirrels.international
 

djbaxter

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#6
Another thing to keep in mind is that CCTLDs (country code) get ranked higher than GTLDs (general) in searches coming from within that country.
There used to be some truth to that belief, although ranking has always been more complicated than that, but search has changed a lot in the past few years and it's really not necessarily true anymore. What a country TLD does is tell Google and searchers that that country is the main focus for the site. (It does not necessarily indicate the language of the site.)

However, sites that use country domains can and often do rank well internationally. The reverse is also true: generic domains can and often do outrank country domains.

Today's search engines rank primarily on content and on relevance of that content to the search query. Things like TLD and "exact match keyword domains" have dropped way off as ranking factors to the point where they are largely irrelevant to search.

However, there may well still be some advantage to a country TLD in the eyes of searchers, although a 2014 study indicated that the majority of searchers were basically unaware of the meaning of country TLDs and many could not even correctly identify the country given the country TLD: see Study: How Searchers Perceive Country Code Top-Level Domains - Moz.
 
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#7
Today's search engines rank primarily on content and on relevance of that content to the search query. Things like TLD and "exact match keyword domains" have dropped way off as ranking factors to the point where they are largely irrelevant to search.

However, there may well still be some advantage to a country TLD in the eyes of searchers, although a 2014 study indicated that the majority of searchers were basically unaware of the meaning of country TLDs and many could not even correctly identify the country given the country TLD: see
I assure you that localization is still very important. Try carrying out searches through a VPN and you will see. Regarding that searchers couldn't identify the correct TLD, i believe that it does not mean anything with regard to the existence of local search. Furthermore, the participants were from USA and Australia. It does not surprise me that those from USA had no clue about CCTLD as this is something very fringe in USA. How many actually use .us? But i assure you that everyone in Italy knows what .it means, everyone in Germany knows what .de means, etc. In non English speaking countries, the CCTLD is much more popular than .com etc, partly because it is tied to the local market and also probably because the good .com names are all taken!
 

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#9
Here is an excellent and very creative use of a new TLD: grade.us

Get More Online Reviews - Best Reputation and Review Management Platform | Grade.us

This is a company based in the US which manages online reviews for companies, large and small. They procured the domain name and also named their company GradeUS so the branding is perfect. And of course the link between "grade us" and online reviews is also perfect. So you get domain name, company name, and company services all linked perfectly together. :)
 
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