Has anyone seen this cash flow tool?

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Flight by Finagraph. Flight’s Cash Flow Calendar analyzes past transactions and predicts your upcoming cash flow automatically. Flight’s Cash Flow Calendar provides you an at a glance view of your businesses cash flow allowing you to know how much cash you will have every day of the month.
 

Edvin

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Cashflow trends ... an interesting idea!

I haven't used the tool; but, can provide some insights on the topic; so, here is slight divergence...
It is worth stating that projection is valuable for estimating numerous KPIs, which include:
  • Expected number of customers
  • Expected result from marketing campaign
  • Projected sales volume
  • Inventory forecast
  • etc
Divergence from expectation requires close inspection from stakeholders.
For example, if you ran a similar campaign and noticed lower conversion rate, this might be due to competition or other internal/external forces that you have to identify.

There are numerous predictive strategies for forcasting, where the granddaddy is Holt-Winter model.
Holt-Winter model accounts for both seasonality and trend.

A typical process for creating projection involves the following steps:
  1. Create a spread sheet of past data
  2. Enter magic formulas for first couple data rows
  3. Copy formulas to for most of the data set
  4. Forecast values for remaining data set period
  5. Use excel solver to adjust index multipliers based on Mean Average Deviation (MAD) of actual vs forcast
  6. Once multiplier indices are found the formulas are copied for the remaining data set so that the model can forecast the next period.
Here is Video of Holt's Winter model in excel.
Here is an article that goes over five forcasting models in excel and ending with Holt's.
forcast.jpg
Another thing that Finagraph reports is Anomaly detector, which is achieved with control charts. Control charts is simply the process of setting statistical upper and lower boundary of your data points. In presence of few known patterns a signal is detected:
  • A single point outside the control limits.
  • Two out of three successive points are on the same side of the centerline ...
  • Four out of five successive points are on the same side of the centerline ...
  • A run of eight in a row are on the same side of the centerline. ...
  • Obvious consistent or persistent patterns ...
controlCharts.png
Here is a control chart video in excel, and a simple article about it. If you google or lookup Statistical Process Control (SPC) you will learn more about it.​

Conclusion:
Your inquiry regarding Finagraph is analogous to asking what we think of a calculator.
The calculator will give consistent and reliable result as long we don't fat-finger the data.
Vendor comparision is again like comparing two different calculators...that is, which graph and function feature you enjoy having.

You can rely on Finagraph reports for your projection and can use the steps that I outlined to even verify their result. You may not get the exact answer (and they may even use different algorithm)r; but, you'll be surprised with accuracy of your own effort and may decide to just use excel. However, the convenience of tools like Finagraph cannot be overlooked.​
 
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Great insight and explanation. I appreciate it. It's my understanding that you don't type anything into the Finagraph Flight product, it is an add-on to Quickbooks. It also does all the work in less than a minute. Does the data get into your model by typing? Thus the disclaimer of fat-fingering.
 

Edvin

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it is an add-on to Quickbooks
Cool...that's convenient.

... Does the data get into your model by typing? Thus the disclaimer of fat-fingering.
I think you are asking how the data gets into excel.
If so, you can export from quickbooks (or almost any other software) into CSV format, which is a comma delimited text file that excel recognizes.
In some cases you can import data directly into excel by navigating to Data ->External Data -> From Other Sources.
In either case, you would copy/paste your data into an existing excel forecast template, which you can google instead of creating from scratch. Don't forget to use the excel solver to find the best values for alpha, beta, and gamma multiplier variables.
 
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Ok. I'll try both. My current tendencies are to use automation when I can. Excel can be a bit messy. @ $14 per month, Flight is worth a shot. It seemed to work well in the trial. The cash flow calendar predicts cash 60 days out in a pretty cool format.
 
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