Great Example of Mailer Marketing

Users who viewed this discussion (Total:8)

Edvin

MVP
Member
Top Contributor
Joined
Oct 2, 2017
Messages
330
Likes
304
Points
63
Thread starter #1
I'm not sure about you, but I've seen the Daymond John's ad, a Shark Tank Investor, all over this forum. I've even seen him other places on the net as well.
I have thought about attending his event but dismissed the idea.

Well, a few days ago I received a glossy (apparently expensive) ad with two tickets (marked at $147 each) to attend a local event. I don't know what to expect in the event; but, I'll see if I can make myself available :)

39602727821_f042768037_z.jpg

Now lets talk about marketing:
  • The mailing was high glossy print to maintain the image brand.
  • The mailing envelope was personally addressed to me.
  • The target audience is obviously entrepreneurs.
  • He probably got my information from a mailing list; satisfying certain demographics (age, income, etc).
  • The information may have been cross referenced with Small Business Development Center records to find entrepreneurs.
  • The marketers may even have looked at county or state records to find business owners.
  • Not sure if I would attend for $150; but, a free ticket from an event that is backed by a celebrity investor did get my attention.
  • $147 ticket ends with 7, which I talked about in pricing section of my post.
    The odd number makes the consumer take the time to think about the value; as appose to bargain price ending with 9.
  • It had an offer that is hard to refuse; it's FREE.
  • They probably had a trigger. That is, Try to get paid subscribers until a specific date. The free offer was sent to entrepreneurs after expiration date to insure maximum ticket sell revenue as well as lead generation.
  • He used an ad agency to help with creative, copy, photo-shoot. We don't expect someone like Mr. Daymond to take his own picture; and the the quality is apparent.
 
Joined
Jan 9, 2018
Messages
17
Likes
4
Points
3
#2
Thats cool,( your eye is everywhere, where you can boost your knowledge.... :)
) Please Share the event after you join....
 

Edvin

MVP
Member
Top Contributor
Joined
Oct 2, 2017
Messages
330
Likes
304
Points
63
Thread starter #3
I couldn't attend Daymond John's event from above because of a scheduling conflict. My 6 year old son worked hard (with little help from dad) to build his derby car and I didn't want him to miss the experience of cub-scout derby race because of my endeavor.

In any case, I'm noticing promotions more as I start thinking about my own business.
Yesterday I received another great example of Mailer Marketing from Men's Wearhouse, which I wanted to share with you.

The ad is a large glossy print, which undoubtedly was not cheap and is a promotion geared towards high-school students that will attend end-of-shool-year prom celebration party.

Do you think it was an accident that I received this email and that my son is a high-school student?
Additionally do you think it was an accident that my next door neighbor who has two children under the age of 5, didn't get this ad mailer?

PIC_0040.JPG
PIC_0041.JPG

Both my neighbor and I have used Men's Wearhouse (MH) in the past and we are probably in their database; but, MH relied on (third-party data) to send out this mailing. How can I be so certain? Well, if we look at the mailing address (below), we find that they got my first name wrong. Additionally, I haven't used MH for a longtime, so they would not have my current address in their records; so, they would have to rely on third-party data to get my contact info.


PIC_0042.JPG To be honest, I didn't notice the wrong first name in the mailer at first; I don't usually look at the mail recipient if it looks like it is intended for me.​


Now that I presented some great examples of mailer marketing, I challenge you to join me in creative thinking and take this to the next level... How can marketers improve on this?

First, my high-school son is 14 years old. So, it would be best if they waited for another three years.
Or perhaps it is better for them to keep sending me mailers for the remaining three years as a reminder? Na, their effort is better focused toward the conclusion of high-school; but, sending multiple mailers towards for the prospecting high school graduates.

Second, how much attention would this mailer get if the young man's face on the front cover was my son's face?
Is that possible? Why not! After all, you've seen his picture in this forum. His face (along with every member of my family) is undoubtedly some where on social media (facebook, twitter, instgram, linkedin, etc).
I don't think we need machine learning; but, exiting social and third-party data maybe able to connect these dots.
Even if we hire outsource someone to manually scrape the web for a small mailer campaign might prove interesting exercise in the quality of conversion and ROI effort.

Lastly, I want to conclude with saying that sometimes it might be more effective marketing campaign to send un-targeted mass mailing than a laser focused personalized marketing; but, this is something that you have to figure-out for your business via trial & error.
 
Last edited:
Joined
Feb 14, 2018
Messages
13
Likes
26
Points
13
#4
Old school marketing is still around and can be effective but...
Here are few comments/questions

1) The promotion ad flyer seems dated.

2) I assume this is directed to parents who probably make up a good proportion of people buying for their kid's event. If so speak to them directly. Meaning hopefully they also target moms, and of the parents buying, moms make up a good portion if not the majority. So again speak to them. Can't tell if they are, hopefully they are though.

3) Let's say this is geared toward and gets in the hands of a high school kid, where is the QR code to quickly get them to the site (Not to buy but to say schedule an appointment, or even speak to someone with a question).
I strongly believe in linking every customer touch point with smartphone/digital engagement, somehow.

4) Men's Wearhouse need to get people into the store does this ad have a real "call to action" to get them into the store (can't tell from the pix, maybe it does). I don't know if a lot a people get tuxes online so the model is to get people into the store.

5) They could have saved some money. A half size postcard with a QR code will play to the younger and event crowd, can't fold it easy (a trifold) and put in a pocket or for women a small purse. If I get this in the mail and don't want to forget the ad, I take a picture and toss the expensive color glossy fold out. Who still does trifolds via mail anyway?...Men's Wearhouse.:)

6) The trifold promotion flyer just does not seem contemporary and up to date. I assume these pix are for the best sellers of tuxes from prior years. If not that's an issue. Advertise your best sellers when you got to pay for the ad (unless you are trying to move slow-moving items for sale, which is a different strategy).

To your continued success.
Daryl
 
Last edited:

Edvin

MVP
Member
Top Contributor
Joined
Oct 2, 2017
Messages
330
Likes
304
Points
63
Thread starter #5
Great tips Darly; see my comments below.
1) The promotion ad flyer seems dated.
a) Do you mean the quality of ad; if so, then that is my fault for doing a poor job of taking the picutre.

b) If you mean creative/artwork can be improved, then what do you suggest? I lack in the creativity department :)
The motivation for these questions is to learn things that we should consider (if we can remember).​

2) I assume this is directed to parents who probably make up a good proportion of people buying for their kid's event. If so speak to them directly. Meaning hopefully they also target moms, and of the parents buying, moms make up a good portion if not the majority. So again speak to them. Can't tell if they are, hopefully they are though.
The ad is mostly pricing, but it does talk to the parents:
Did you know your teen can earn a free tux/suite rental or a $400 shopping spree? All they have to do is join our Prom Rep program and get five friends to rent with us. Visit our store or menswhearhouse.com/promrep for more information.
...
We'll show them how to let their personality shine with colorful socks, pockets silks and lapel pins
3) Let's say this is geared toward and gets in the hands of a high school kid, where is the QR code to quickly get them to the site (Not to buy but to say schedule an appointment, or even speak to someone with a question).
I strongly believe in linking every customer touch point with smartphone/digital engagement, somehow.
A few months ago I would completely agree with digital touch point on the print; but, I want to draw your attention to a finding that I talked about in one of my postings. In short, the business owner found that digital touch points lead the prospective customers research competitors online; thus, yielding to lower conversion. By excluding the the digital touch point on the flyer and using phone number for call to action, he argued that he received more leads. Furthermore he argued that a person is better in promoting product/service than a website.

This makes sense to me; but, I am skeptical and agree with importance of digital tracking in today's marketing campaign. Therefore, I would suggest A/B testing the mailers. One set of mailer can contain the digital footprint for tracking, and the other an exclude digital messaging (but track-able via coupons). Then track the result of the campaign so that they can be revised for the next campaign.​


4) Men's Wearhouse need to get people into the store does this ad have a real "call to action" to get them into the store (can't tell from the pix, maybe it does). I don't know if a lot a people get tuxes online so the model is to get people into the store.
You make a fantastic point. I don't see a good Call To Action (CTA). Only the message from above:
"...Visit our store or menswhearhouse.com/promrep for more information...".
Copy writing for good CTA should consider the following (more here, here, ...):
  1. Make them Action-Oriented
  2. Use Persuasive Text
  3. Include Strong Visuals
  4. Create a Sense of Urgency
  5. Make them Easy to Find
With that in mind, I would add this message in strong large print near middle/end of the fold: (what do you think)?

Don't limit your teen's choices by waiting to the last minute, call today to help your teen find an AMAZING look for life-long memorable experience.
Above copy ads the sense of urgency; but, it also makes use of marketing power keywords You and Amazing (here, here, here, here, here, ...).

5) They could have saved some money. A half size postcard with a QR code will play to the younger and event crowd, can't fold it easy (a trifold) and put in a pocket or for women a small purse. If I get this in the mail and don't want to forget the ad, I take a picture and toss the expensive color glossy fold out. Who still does trifolds via mail anyway?...Men's Wearhouse.:)
There is a "$40 coupon" and a "40% coupon" in the back that are perforated for credit-size carry, which addresses the carrying concern you highlighted.

The QR code is still questionable (see my A/B test); but, the coupon helps with tracking marketing campaign.

Lastly, I agree that they could save money; but, to what extent?
I love the fact that you are challenging it.
Do you have any insight/experience you can share?
Looking at this article suggests that tri-fold is really a small brochure, which is usually presented when client has expressed more interest; otherwise, a "sell sheet" would do. We can take this further to talk about the size of the flyer as well, which I would say that A/B testing is the best gauge.

6) The trifold promotion flyer just does not seem contemporary and up to date. I assume these pix are for the best sellers of tuxes from prior years. If not that's an issue. Advertise your best sellers when you got to pay for the ad (unless you are trying to move slow-moving items for sale, which is a different strategy).
Interesting point; but, I doubt if Men's Wearhouse paid for models, and photo-shoot just for this mailer. Instead, they probably used a photo-bank, which is what most small businesses would do. However, I do like that personal.​
 
Last edited by a moderator:
Joined
Feb 14, 2018
Messages
13
Likes
26
Points
13
#6
Great response Edvin,

Based on your posts you are very creative. If someone gave you a creative work or piece (a marketing plan or sales plan, with creative content) I guarantee you will creatively execute that plan. I know you are referring to the creative artwork but...creativity in managment occurs at each step in the business spectrum. I consider myself creative at solving problems no matter what discipline the problem is, and for the enormous amount I don't know I "creatively" seek resources.

Anyway I was not impressed with the mailer. I see that you indicated that it was geared toward parents but I still believe calls to action are so important as you indicated.

Also that QR should go to a deep page in the website with a catch to come into the store (an extra 5% of maybe). Remember once they are in the store the "upselling should make up for the lost discounts (if done right).

A/B testing is very effective if done correctly to pinpont where and how effective a campaign might be. You can save depending on what you want to accomplish. A tri-fold mailer just seems to expensive to me when a half sive postcard will do to try and motivate store traffic.

Men's wearhouse already has name recognition, so brand development is not part of the equation. Which could make the tri-fold piece important to develop brand recognition for some businesses.
Also, for me the mailer was not diverse enough in its ethnic makeup but that will depend on geography and I did see some diversity in the flyer.

Great topic!
To your continued success,
Daryl
Nexlevelbusiness.com


 

SARubin

MVP
Member
Joined
Apr 19, 2018
Messages
25
Likes
49
Points
13
#8
Out of curiosity, when is the prom? If it's more than 5 or 6 weeks away, they might be wasting money by sending the promotion out this early.

The sad reality of today is, we seem to live in a world of electronically induced ADHD. And for many, this flyer will be all but forgotten in a few days (maybe a week or two, at most?)

Unless this is just the beginning of a multi-part promotion, and they're going for the frequency of awareness approach? In which case, a few more mailers at given intervals could give MH a solid "top of mind" awareness leading up to the prom.

Second, how much attention would this mailer get if the young man's face on the front cover was my son's face?
Is that possible? Why not! After all, you've seen his picture in this forum. His face (along with every member of my family) is undoubtedly some where on social media (facebook, twitter, instgram, linkedin, etc).
I don't think we need machine learning; but, exiting social and third-party data maybe able to connect these dots.
Even if we hire outsource someone to manually scrape the web for a small mailer campaign might prove interesting exercise in the quality of conversion and ROI effort.
A few months ago, I think the personalized picture would have been an awesome idea. Unfortunately, timing always plays a key factor.

And with all the news cycles of personal data being collected by big companies (and being exposed and/or sold to third parties) now, having a personalized image scraped from the internet, could come across as a bit stalkerish, and invasive?

It could be worth a try. But my gut tells me it would backfire.


Just my 2 cents

All the best,
SAR
 
Joined
Jul 19, 2018
Messages
30
Likes
38
Points
18
#9
I am considering doing a DIY mailer and figured I should search the forum before posting questions. This thread is fascinating. I would like to offer a couple thoughts myself and also ask for some advice.

First of all, I do not believe you missed a dang thing from that Daymond event!!! He keeping popping up on a sponsored ad on my FB timeline with a free offer for the class. I was enticed too, then when I clicked the button for info it said he "could not personally be there". I do not appreciate someone using their face and prestige to hook me and then toss me off to some "pro" they claim to have taught their message and methods.

I agree QR codes works well for young folks. I am not young but I like the premise and experiment with them often. I made a yard sign that just said "juice cleanse info" with a QR code that I put in front of a big salon. It worked. However, I did a facebook survey of my "friends" and majority of folks my age don't know what it is or know and don't use them or used for a specific situation once and then never again. (I made the sign despite the survey results because I feel salon goers are a bit more into phone technology these days than the average person, lol! (#selfies)

I think the incentive for multiple referrals is brilliant since most kids rent a limo and take pictures in a pack.

I believe the mailer would go out early to get ahead of the last minute (gentlemanly late) prom rush. Tailoring and altering is time consuming. It would likely be targeted to the prom decision maker/ purse of the household (mom)- mom often coordinates the limo order too!

Okay so now to my question. I have zero budget right now, but I am pressing forward doing a lot of DIY efforts. I am planning a glossy print mailer on quality stock. I have an advertising degree so I do well designing on my own. I took notes about CTA- that was great, thanks.

My question is, I am targeting one high end neighborhood (not gated) of approximately 250 homes as a test market. I have priced EveryDoorDirectMail thru USPS and as cheap as it is, I still cannot afford it (and it is boxing me into twice the geo area to include non-targeted). I also see it is illegal to place non-U.S. postal mail in mailboxes myself. I have a return address stamp with logo. I am thinking of attaching a label on the back side with the offer details, writing the addresses myself (yes I have awesome handwriting, lol!) and stamping them to mail off.

Does anyone have experience, ideas or thoughts about this?
 

djbaxter

Administrator
Moderator
Joined
Nov 10, 2016
Messages
1,503
Likes
718
Points
113
#10
My question is, I am targeting one high end neighborhood (not gated) of approximately 250 homes as a test market. I have priced EveryDoorDirectMail thru USPS and as cheap as it is, I still cannot afford it (and it is boxing me into twice the geo area to include non-targeted). I also see it is illegal to place non-U.S. postal mail in mailboxes myself. I have a return address stamp with logo. I am thinking of attaching a label on the back side with the offer details, writing the addresses myself (yes I have awesome handwriting, lol!) and stamping them to mail off.
Are you saying it is illegal to go door to door and place flyers or envelopes in the mailboxes of homeowners/renters? That seems strange to say the least.

In helping to promote a business for my ex, we created "postcards" and flyers from Vistaprint quite inexpensively and had them delivered door to door in specific neighborhoods. The original plan was to hire high school kids to do it for a small fee but actually one of her friends volunteered and recruited a couple of other people to do it. She did get some new customers from that promotion, although I can't recall how many.

Could that be an option for you?
 

Edvin

MVP
Member
Top Contributor
Joined
Oct 2, 2017
Messages
330
Likes
304
Points
63
Thread starter #11
Are you saying it is illegal to go door to door and place flyers or envelopes in the mailboxes of homeowners/renters? That seems strange to say the least.
I didn't know about this either; but, according to Corrnel law - 18 U.S. Code § 1725 - Postage unpaid on deposited mail matter:
Whoever knowingly and willfully deposits any mailable matter such as statements of accounts, circulars, sale bills, or other like matter, on which no postage has been paid, in any letter box established, approved, or accepted by the Postal Service for the receipt or delivery of mail matter on any mail route with intent to avoid payment of lawful postage thereon, shall for each such offense be fined under this title.
.. we created "postcards" and flyers from Vistaprint quite inexpensively and had them delivered door to door ...
Could that be an option for you?
I think 250 homes of door-to-door delivery is a great idea.

Does anyone have ...ideas or thoughts about this?
Another option is to determine the mailing address for yourself since you are targeting low number of homes.

Using google map, right click on each home and click "What's here" to get its mailing address. You'll have all 250 addresses in about 5 minutes.

No matter how you proceed, remember to repeat the same marketing flyer campaign at least three times; even if you have to reduce the number of homes. You may find my post on door-hangers informative.

If possible do an A/B test with different discount or design. Use a simple method, where all even homes street numbers get card A and all the odd home street numbers get card B. You can also test the impact of color vs grey scale ads. In my recent school flyer campaign, I realized color print was cost prohibitive for me. So, I had to settle on black & white flyers. I could not personally do A/B test because I had no control on how the Flyers were disbursed to classroom and students.
 

djbaxter

Administrator
Moderator
Joined
Nov 10, 2016
Messages
1,503
Likes
718
Points
113
#12
Well that's true. If you're not allowed to place them in a mailbox, I guess a door hanger or just slipping it into a crack at the side or bottom of the door would work...
 

SARubin

MVP
Member
Joined
Apr 19, 2018
Messages
25
Likes
49
Points
13
#13
I am planning a glossy print mailer on quality stock. I have an advertising degree so I do well designing on my own.
If you get a chance to upload a picture of your mailer, I'd love to see it. I have a fairly solid reputation as a Direct Response Copywriter (with more than one control piece under my belt). But I'd be the first to admit that I stink as a package designer. So I'm always interested in seeing how someone with design skills puts things together.

My question is, I am targeting one high end neighborhood (not gated) of approximately 250 homes as a test market. I have priced EveryDoorDirectMail thru USPS and as cheap as it is, I still cannot afford it (and it is boxing me into twice the geo area to include non-targeted). I also see it is illegal to place non-U.S. postal mail in mailboxes myself. I have a return address stamp with logo. I am thinking of attaching a label on the back side with the offer details, writing the addresses myself (yes I have awesome handwriting, lol!) and stamping them to mail off.

Does anyone have experience, ideas or thoughts about this?
Yeah, EDDM to only 250 addresses is a tricky bit of business. Those numbers are not really big enough to bring the general law of averages into play.

Of course there's no "absolute" statistics that hold true for all direct mailings, but a general average, to a semi-targeted list, is usually around 2% (+/-) response rate, with at least 1000 pieces mailed.

Although, with a highly targeted audience and the right message, your mailer can certainly do much better than average.

And of course it also depends on your offer, and the way it's presented. But the audience is far more important. Because even an average message to the right audience, at the right time, will outperform a brilliant message sent to people who have zero interest in what you're selling.

So my big question for you is "How did you decide to target this particular postal route?"

Did this come from feedback you got from talking with your best customers, or from the survey you sent out? (have you determined that many of your best clients come from the same backgrounds, or neighborhoods, as the people living in your EDDM target audience?)

If you only have a vaguely targeted audience, then one possible issue I see with this mailing is that you're sending it to people's homes. And unless you have a really irresistible offer, inertia will be working against you.

Picture this scenario... Someone comes home from a long day at work, and gets your flyer in the mail. Even if they're compelled by the offer, they're probably not going to leave their house right away, and run right down to visit your juice shop.

Instead, your flyer gets tossed on the table with the other "interesting" things they may want to look at later. But when they leave for work the next morning, will they remember your flyer on the way out the door? (maybe... maybe not)


By all means, give it a try. Because if you have a highly targeted audience, then it might just work like gangbusters. And if it does, then that's awesome. But if it doesn't work, then next time you may want to consider using the law of momentum to your advantage. (Targeting people who are already in daily motion, when they receive your message)

Which brings me back to my question from the other thread... How much do you know about the lifestyles of your best clients?


If most of them are office workers, then your flyer might do better going to every office building within 20 miles of your shop. Rather than to people's homes.

Or, if many of them eat at the same restaurants (for example), then a nice Joint Venture partnership with those eateries could work quite well (you give your customers a coupon to the restaurant, and they give their customers a coupon to your juice bar)

Of course, these are just a couple examples. because I have no idea who your clientele is. But the concept is the same... Find out what your best customers have in common, then present your offer to people with similar traits, at a time when they're most receptive to receiving it

This generally gives your promotion its best shot at attracting more similar "high value" clients to a business like yours.

I wish you the best of luck with your promotion. And I'd be genuinely interested in knowing how it works out for you.

All the best,
SAR
 
Joined
Jul 19, 2018
Messages
30
Likes
38
Points
18
#14
Well that's true. If you're not allowed to place them in a mailbox, I guess a door hanger or just slipping it into a crack at the side or bottom of the door would work...
So I followed the advice to change from a mailer to a doorhanger. It was far cheaper, more print space and not mixed in with the mail! I focused only on my high end product, no discount offered (lol) and added a QR code for the menu.

A team member went out to 2 neighborhoods in a couple hours to a golf course neighborhood and another nice one near the YMCA. Spoke to a few people right on their lawns. Several people came in this weekend and mentioned it. Thank you! :)
 
Top