dale001

Member
Joined
Jun 23, 2019
Messages
3
Greetings,

The confusion surrounds this question on the PA100 form:

Enter the percentage that this establishment's receipts or revenues represent of the total PA receipts or revenues of the Business Entity:”

Since I intend to sell items online (e-commerce) and I live in Pennsylvania, I will potentially have buyers in all 50 states, so should I put 2% (1 out of 50 states) as my answer?

Dale
 

VirtualGlobalPhone

Moderator
Joined
Apr 22, 2016
Messages
1,296
dale001 , welcome to bizwarriors.

Did you not got a chance to have a chat / email or call with your company accountant? This is some of the basic knowledge which normally all explain which formation of the company itself.
 

dale001

Member
Joined
Jun 23, 2019
Messages
3
dale001 , welcome to bizwarriors.

Did you not got a chance to have a chat / email or call with your company accountant? This is some of the basic knowledge which normally all explain which formation of the company itself.

I thought someone on here would know because it’s a standard question, no matter the state.
 

ElizabethLee

Member
Joined
Apr 8, 2021
Messages
2
Sell items online are taxed as well as any other sales. To tell the truth, I wouldn't like to pay taxes for it, but the law says the opposite. I would recommend you contact specialists who can advise you at the proper level regarding this issue. I don't know basic information about payments and possible tax relief. So, I always ask for help in this question for someone else who understands this. You can also find some companies on the internet that can consult you and give reliable information. They specialize in helping such entrepreneurs and individuals
 

djbaxter

Administrator
Joined
Nov 10, 2016
Messages
2,583
It may also depend on the laws applicable to where you do business, and the volume of any sales you make.

For example, in Canada, a business does not have to register and to collect sales tax (GST/HST) if your sales are less than $30,000 CAD:


The federal Goods and Services Tax/Harmonized Sales Tax (GST/HST) applies to most goods and services supplied in Canada. GST and HST are the same value-added tax, with GST referring to tax at a 5% rate in so-called non-harmonized jurisdictions, and HST referring to tax at higher so-called harmonized tax rates, currently at 13% (for sales to Ontario) and 15% (for sales to Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island, and Newfoundland and Labrador).

Businesses resident in Canada with annual sales on an associated basis of $30,000 or less are generally not required to register for GST/HST. Canadian-based retailers with sales of more than $30,000 including associated entities are required to register and charge the GST/HST where applicable. Rules for registering for provincial sales tax in British Columbia, Saskatchewan and Manitoba vary by province.

Businesses not resident in Canada are not required to register for GST/HST if they are not carrying on business in Canada. However, if a non-resident of Canada making taxable supplies to customers in Canada were found to be carrying on business in Canada, it would be required to register and collect applicable GST/HST on its sales. The facts of each situation must be considered on their own merits when determining whether a business not resident in Canada is carrying on business in Canada.

On the other hand, from the same article:

However, all Canadian retailers selling goods online in the U.S. need to consider the U.S. Supreme Court decision in South Dakota v. Wayfair, released in June 2018. The Wayfair decision will likely expand Canadian companies’ obligation to register for, collect and remit sales tax, and file sales tax returns, in the U.S.
 
Top Bottom