Choose a Domain Name That Will Stand the Test of Time

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djbaxter

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Thread starter #1
How to Choose a Domain Name That Will Stand the Test of Time
by Gillon Hunter, SearchEngineJournal.com
May 28, 2018

1. Does It Match Your Brand Name?
  • It’s bad branding to have a company name which doesn’t match the domain name.
  • Using the same name will help people find your website more easily when they hear about you and type your name into a search engine or the browser address bar.
  • Consistency is key and will help you grow a memorable and strong brand.
2. Is It 'Well Branded'?
It should be
  • Unique.
  • Clear.
  • Short.
  • Meaningful.
  • Catchy.
  • Inspiring.
Think about:
  • How it sounds.
  • What it looks like when written down.
  • How relatable it is.
  • If there is a hidden meaning or play on words you’re going for.

3. What Appears When You Google Your Brand?
Do a Google search for your brand! You need to know what kind of resources are already ranking for your chosen name.

4. Is It Easy to Read/Spell?
It needs to be to build a strong brand which people remember.

5. Don’t Go over the Top with Keywords
Choose a good, creative brand name over a keyword-heavy domain name any day of the week... Remember that Google “went after” low-quality exact match domains (EMD) in 2012 to ensure they do not rank well in the Google search results. That should tell you what Google thinks of spammy domain names.

6. No Hyphens
Using hyphens in your domain name is low quality for many reasons.
  • It looks spammy (e.g., london-city-guide.com).
  • If you tell someone your domain name you’d have to say “London, hyphen, city, hyphen, guide, dot com”. Rubbish, right?!
  • It’s just downright ugly.

7. Is It Optimized Without Being Spammy?
If you’re a London-based business and you sell something in London. Then it makes sense to have “London” in the domain name. Just don’t be spammy with it. Again, for me, londonvibes.com is a far better, more brandable and quality domain name compared to london-city-guide.com or even londoncityguide.com.

8. Is It Short?
Short and sweet to keep it neat. Not only is a short domain name better looking, easier to remember and type into a browser, it’s also better for your email addresses and business cards.

9. What Top Level Domain (TLD)?
The most common TLDs are:
  • .com
  • .org
  • .net
  • .co
  • .us
Is your target market global (as in do your potential customers live all over the world)?
  • Yes: Choose .com
  • No: Choose a TLD for the country you’re targeting (e.g., .co.uk if the United Kingdom is where your target audience is based)
Exceptions: For example, if you’re an Internet or IT company, you could consider a “.net” TLD. Or, if you’re a nonprofit, “.org” could be a good option.

10. Is It Unique?
Is anyone else is using the domain name you want to go for. You might find that although the one you want to go for is available, someone else is using the same domain with a different TLD. Ideally, you want a domain name which is completely unique.

11. Are All the Social Handles Available Too?
It’s pretty annoying when you dream up the perfect brand name, get hold of the domain name, and then find out someone has taken that name on one of the social media platforms. You can use this tool to see if the social channels for your chosen name are available.

12. Check for Trademarks
Make sure the name is not already trademarked. You should also look at trademarking the name yourself to avoid potential copyright problems in the future.
Read more...
 

Edvin

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#3
I'm sticking my head up for some air before I go back under water. This post really belongs somewhere else; but, I figured I'll add something here.

With all the .com suffix taken, I started looking at other options, which was a component of my revised business name research. I visit this forum by typing the URL directly, and I don't even remember how I got here. Similarly, customers that need/want your service will remember you.

Therefore, I feel we shouldn't use our domain name directly for campaigns; instead, I advocate marketing with ShortURL that ties to your analytics tracking. For example, we can use the google campaign URL builder to track campaigns via google analytics.

Here is how I posted a link on facebook.

:cool:My website url
www . stemlearning.education
My landing page:confused:
www . stemlearning.education/blog/2018/05/28/summer-2018-venue-location-finalized/
:eek: My google landing page with google analytics URL
www . stemlearning.education/blog/2018/05/28/summer-2018-venue-location-finalized/?utm_source=facebook&utm_medium=post&utm_campaign=social_info&utm_content=launch
URL on Facebook :)
now.gd/camproom

Similarly, I want to print some temporary 24"x36" banners to put around the city; once again I have decided to use a different ShortUrl that redirects to my domain with google analytics tracking.

sign.png
**** DON'T TYPE ABOVE URL to avoid skewing my result ****

Above ad has several things going for it:
  • Easy to read & remember ad url
  • My city name is in the URL and drivers are likely to type it.
  • The shortUrl redirects to my website with campaign encoded URL
  • It has my brand logo for those that recognize it
  • Easy to read for fast moving vehicles

  • Don't you like my color choices? If not, then read this post.
    If you still disagree, then tell me what would be better. With my short URL scheme, I can easily do A/B test.
If you are wondering, I have below domains pointing to my local install of YOURLS to handle the campaign code redirections:
  • enroll.gd
  • now.gd
  • reg.gd
  • stem.at
So, do you want to know how the banner is doing?

Well, I don't know yet; I'm on my way to see sample at print shop.

Take care...

P.S.
Even my signature link uses the campaign code to track how many people from BizWarriors look at my site.
 
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djbaxter

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With all the scams, spams, and malware on the net these days, I, like many people, am distrustful of shortened URLs.

I can see a point to using them along with the name of your company or campaign in printed marketing material. There, you know that the person is going to have to type it in manually so shorter and memorable has an advantage. In actual links on the net, though, it looks too much like deception.

I hadn't noticed that your signature uses a shortened URL until you mentioned it, and I know that you're not trying to do anyone any harm here, but I must point out that our Forum Rules specifically prohibit the use of shortened URLs. There are alternate ways to identify the source of clicks ("referer") in your URLs.
 

Edvin

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#5
I, like many people, am distrustful of shortened URLs.
Agreed. Studies show that Branded URLs have 39% higher click.
Generic short URLs vs branded links, which has a better CTR?
Though I am using shortURL, I'm still trying to keep it branded to have the best of both worlds.
I must point out that our Forum Rules specifically prohibit the use of shortened URLs.
Oops, my bad. There is really no reason for me to use shortURL on the forum; I was just being lazy.
 
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#6
In order not to look like spam or scam you need to follow some general rules for creating a domain name.

Like:
  1. Always Go With com
  2. Use Keywords In The Domain
  3. Keep It Short
  4. It Is Always A Plus To Be Easy To Pronounce And Spell
  5. Keep The Domain Unique And Brandable
  6. Try To Avoid Doubled Letters
  7. Give Your Domain Room To Expand

 

djbaxter

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Always Go With com
... if you can. But .com names are harder to come by and if your business is a local one you may get just as much domain-friendliness from a country tld (top level domain), e.g., .ca for Canada, .co.uk for the UK, etc. The caution with a country tld is if the .com version of your domain already is taken it might create a bit of confusion, depending on its location. Whenever possible, I try to get both the .com version and the .ca version and let my client decide which o0ne they prefer; then I redirect the other version to the preferred version.

Years ago when I bought psychlinks.ca the .com version was owned by a squatter. They wanted $1500 or $1800 USD for the .com version and I declined. I built up my .ca sites over the years and then a few years ago the .com version became available (abandoned because by then the .ca version was too well established, I guess) and I was able to grab it for the standard $10. :)
 
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#8
Having a good domain name is obviously a nice thing but i believe the importance of domains is grossly overrated. 30 years ago we would probably think that names like NameCheap, Google, FaceBook are ridiculous and downright stupid, but look now. Focus on providing a good product and you can get away with any name.

Source: GoDaddy
 
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