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  1. Nunzio Presta

    Nunzio Presta Member

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    What are your thoughts?

    [​IMG]
     

  2. pwarbi

    pwarbi Member

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    This is a tricky one for me this. I think that if a company like Apple gets asked to help in a criminal investigation, especially one as serious as this, then they should be obliged to do so.

    But...I also see apples point of view, and if it gets done this time, it sets a dangerous precedent as who's then going to say they can't demand the same happen for every case in the future?

    Maybe the biggest thing that is being overlooked, is the trust aspect of it all, and it comes to something when the government says we will only use something like this once, but Apple, and the people are saying no you won't, you'll use it again and again, that's why we're not doing it.

    Just shows how much trust we have in the authorities I guess...
     
  3. T J Tutor

    T J Tutor Member

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    The government should never be allowed to press private citizens into violating privacy. The only reason the government doesn't do it itself is because they are so far behind in the coding world. The government already abuses their authority within the digitized world, they are caught in the act regularly.

    If we had to crack a phone to prevent a nuke from falling into the wrong hands, then I am sure a settlement could be reached, but this is not a case where they feel there is imminent danger. This is a case of curiosity by spies. The government's need to be able to infringe on privacy is already out of hand worldwide.

    I know we have worldwide threats that can place us all in peril, but I am not willing to give the government carte blanche to rip into any digital device they choose because they say they need to and without evidence that they need to. In this case, they have no indications there is evidence on the phone that places anyone in peril, at least not that I am aware of.
     
    Nunzio Presta likes this.
  4. pwarbi

    pwarbi Member

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    Slightly off topic but I find it funny how Apple of all companies are portraying themselves as our knights in shining armour who are protecting our rights to privacy and freedom, when it was only about 12 months ago that everyone with an iPhone woke up to a U2 song that Apple had deciding to download to everyone's phone without getting their consent.

    If the FBI want to learn how to bypass security on an iPhone, maybe they should get in touch with Bono as he managed to crack them all in one night, haha!
     
    Nunzio Presta likes this.
  5. Nunzio Presta

    Nunzio Presta Member

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    That's funny....hahahahahah!
     
  6. pwarbi

    pwarbi Member

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    But sadly truthful! Haha.

    Seriously though, I bet if Apple wanted to build this backdoor into their own systems for their own purposes then they'd have already done so by now.

    Then again, If they had, I doubt we's know anyway to be honest.
     

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